Climate Change

FIE has assisted in bringing the 10:10 campaign into Ireland with more than 12 environmental organisations. 10:10 is an ambitious project to trigger mass-engagement and unite every sector of a country behind one simple idea - that together we can achieve a 10% cut in the country's carbon emissions in 2010. This target is in line with what scientists say we need over the next 18 months - very different from idealistic targets set far into the future.

Teaming up with Dublin Zoo two 8 foot tall animatronic, blinking, walking, singing and dancing Polar Bears will set out to bring the message to Ireland's town and cities on January 20, 2010.

First visit the website and sign up.

10:10 in Ireland is

An Taisce + CELT +  Coastwatch + Cultivate + FEASTA + FIE + IDEA + Irish Wildlife Trust + Irish Seal Sanctuary + Sonairta + VOICE


At 8.30 pm on March 28, people around the world will turn their lights off for one hour in a universal effort to show that it is possible to take action on global warming.

Coordinated by the World Wildlife Fund and supported in Ireland by Friends of the Irish Environment, Earth Hour is set to become the world's biggest climate change initiatives - with a goal of 1000 cities and 1,000,000,000 people.

Last year Ireland was alone in the EU in supporting the effort. This year, 74 countries have signed up to date - including, for the first time, Belfast, London, and Paris - which announced this week that the Eiffel tower will join the world's landmarks in going dark for Earth Hour.

See Our Earth Hour Page and download the Poster ‘VOTE EARTH' | Read about the launch in the News of the World |  Press Release | Sign up to be counted.


Friends of the Irish Environment is writing to the Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment Micheál Martin questioning the first trade deal to be announced by the Minister in South Africa.

Harte Peat sells ‘deeply-dug wet peat' which is used as a base for growing mushrooms. The Minister has announced distribution for this product with a local partner company that will see Irish peat distributed through out South Africa.

It is now bidding to expand its markets in Africa into Mozambique to provide Irish peat which can be used to soak up oil pollution.

FIE says that ‘The Minister's description of peat as "an environmentally friendly product" shows a profound ignorance of the causes of climate change which the Cabinet is supposed to be addressing.'

The amount of peat extraction that is happening outside of Bord na Mona landholdings for horticulture compost and the consequent loss of carbon sink must be fully addressed by the Minister before the Government encourages deals like this.'

See our Press Release


At 8.30 pm on March 28, people around the world will turn their lights off for one hour in a universal effort to show that it is possible to take action on global warming.

Coordinated by the World Wildlife Fund and supported in Ireland by Friends of the Irish Environment, Earth Hour is set to become the world's biggest climate change initiatives - with a goal of 1000 cities and 1,000,000,000 people.

Last year Ireland was alone in the EU in supporting the effort. This year, 74 countries have signed up to date - including, for the first time, Belfast, London, and Paris - which announced this week that the Eiffel tower will join the world's landmarks in going dark for Earth Hour.

See Our Earth Hour Page and download the Poster ‘VOTE EARTH' | Read about the launch in the News of the World |  Press Release | Sign up to be counted.


As Ireland's annual emissions of GHGs edges up by another 2% to reach an increase of almost 26% since 1990, FIE is calling for more resources for the Environmental Protection Agency and the Geological Survey of Ireland.

New powers given the EPA last month to supervise Local Authority water schemes come just as industrial installations such Aughinish Aluminum, which existed before the 1999, will come under the IPPC Licensing system later this year.

The groundwater protection office of the Geological Service of Ireland is also under increasing pressure with permanent staff left unreplaced as staff must respond to greater demands under the National Development Plan's Geo-Science initiative with fewer resources. Delays in responding to telephone enquiries to the groundwater section of the GSI are now from 4 to 6 weeks.

It is not only investment in industry and public transport that is required to meet out Kyoto obligations, but funding for our protection agencies as well.

Read:
Talk to the Irish Branch of the International Hydrogeological Association highlighting the chronic shortage of resources to complete the Groundwater Protection Survey of Ireland.
And:
A submission to the Irish EPA detailing failures to monitor traffic emissions on motorways, falling audits of industrial establishments, inadequate water standards to protected rare species, failures in enforcement of drinking water quality, etc. etc. etc…


As Ireland's annual emissions of GHGs edges up by another 2% to reach an increase of almost 26% since 1990, FIE is calling for more resources for the Environmental Protection Agency and the Geological Survey of Ireland.

New powers given the EPA last month to supervise Local Authority water schemes come just as industrial installations such Aughinish Aluminum, which existed before the 1999, will come under the IPPC Licensing system later this year.

The groundwater protection office of the Geological Service of Ireland is also under increasing pressure with permanent staff left unreplaced as staff must respond to greater demands under the National Development Plan's Geo-Science initiative with fewer resources. Delays in responding to telephone enquiries to the groundwater section of the GSI are now from 4 to 6 weeks.

It is not only investment in industry and public transport that is required to meet out Kyoto obligations, but funding for our protection agencies as well.

Read:
Talk to the Irish Branch of the International Hydrogeological Association highlighting the chronic shortage of resources to complete the Groundwater Protection Survey of Ireland.
And:
A submission to the Irish EPA detailing failures to monitor traffic emissions on motorways, falling audits of industrial establishments, inadequate water standards to protected rare species, failures in enforcement of drinking water quality, etc. etc. etc…