Quarries

In December 2007 FIE began an investigation into non-compliance with Quarry registration conditions. The Department of Environment advised that conditions imposed through the Planning Act 2000 registration process were unenforceable. Despite prolonged and widespead lobbying to the Department of the Environment, Local Authorites, the Competitions Authority, the Ombudsman, the Comptroller and Auditor General, and the National Public Procurement Unit the legislation remains unchanged and the ridiculous situation continues where local authorites  to purchase material from Quarries in non-complinace with conditions imposed by the  Local Authrorities, including non-payment of development levies and bonds.

Read the tale of our investigation

 Read the Ombudsman's letter   |   Read Our Press Release   |  Read Stephen Price's two part series in the Sunday Business Post on this story


In December 2007 FIE began an investigation into non-compliance with Quarry registration conditions. Under access to information on the environment legislation FIE requested documentary evidence to confirm compliance with registration conditions. No such documents existed.

When we asked why nothing was being done to enforce the conditions, we were told that the County Council ‘did not believe they had the authority to do so' and that ‘clarification is being sought from the Department of the Environment (DoE) and it has also been referred to the Council's Legal Department for advice'

In April 2008 FIE wrote to the Minister of the Environment bringing this matter to his attention and requesting urgent action. No reply was issued.

The quarry used in the FIE case study continued to operate in non-compliance with registration conditions. So in February 2009 FIE wrote to Cork County Council repeating our concerns and repeating the original AIE request. Their reply stated that they were still waiting for clarification from the DoE. We did however receive sections of an 'environmental management system' (EMS). This showed significant flaws in the quarry registration process. Critical information provided by the quarry owner/operator was inaccurate yet had been accepted verbatim by the County Council. A complaint was issued in relation to this administrative failure in the Quarry Registration process both to Cork County Council and the DoE.

On the 5th May 2009 FIE contacted the Ombudsman informing them that there appeared to have been an administrative breakdown between the DoE and the Local Authority.

The Ombudsman replied that ‘The department advised that conditions imposed on a pre 1964 quarry were unenforceable. The department are aware of the difficulties caused and were looking into it but unfortunately no timeframe was given The ombudsman can not make a finding of maladministration against the local authority if they are not in a position legally to conduct an administrative action'.

However the Ombudsman did not say whether they could make a finding of maladministration against the DoE. To clarify this FIE issued a further letter and we await the reply.

FIE also contacted the Competitions Authority who have a statutory function to advocate reform of legislation, regulations and administrative practices that have anti-competitive effects. However in this case the Competition Authority replied that the Department acknowledge already that there is a problem and hence they deemed their advocacy role as unnecessary. This is despite the fact that the Department have known about this problem since (at least) 2007 and no time frame has been given to address this matter.

The draft Planning Bill 2009 published this month [July 2009] failed to even mention quarries which we were told will be addressed in 'future amendments'.

We asked the Competition Authority specifically if the purchase of quarried material from registered quarries by the state (e.g. county council/NRA) is anti-competitive. We were told that the state is not breaching competition law by doing this. As a purchaser however the State could use its position to strategically purchase from those that have adhered to the conditions imposed by planning authorities, and refuse to purchase from those that have not, in effort to encourage all quarries to comply.

They did suggest we contact the National Public Procurement Unit as this may be against public procurement legislation. But enquiries indicated that although Local Authorities could choose not to purchase from operators who are not in compliance with registration condition they were not obliged to do so.

 

In May FIE were told informally by a Local Authority official that a quarry survey had been sent to all Local Authorities.  To confirm this FIE sent an AIE request to the DoE looking for any documentation, relating to the limitations and unenforceability of Section 261 of the Planning and Development Act including the results of any survey or questionnaire to local authorities. The DoE only provided 12 of 60 records held, all of which relate to FIE enquiries, press releases and published news articles. The failure to give details and reason for refusal and the basis of their decision to withhold 48 records is currently under appeal .

 

FIE wrote to the DoE on the 7th June 2009 requesting a reply to our 28 April 2008 seeking the status of Section 261 of the Planning and Development Act 2000.
We informed the Minister that the Ombudsman had informed us that the DoE had told them on 12 February 2009 that ‘the act did not provide a mechanism for pursuing legal proceedings for non-compliance'. And that it was our understanding from various local authorities that the Minister had not replied to their queries in this regard either. The letter requested a statement on the matter. No answer has been received.

On 16th June FIE wrote to the DoE requesting that they write to all local authorities advising them to purchase no materials from quarries registered under this act which have not paid their levies and complied in full to their conditions of registration. We requested a full reply within 15 days as per the ‘Customer Charter' either acknowledging that such a letter would be issued or giving the reasons for not doing so. No reply has been received.

FIE also wrote to the Comptroller and Auditor General in their role of ‘providing independent assurance that public money is properly managed and spent to good effect'. We gave the example of a Local Authority purchasing material from a quarry for extensive local road upgrades, notwithstanding the failure of the quarry to pay its contribution and address almost all of its 65 conditions of Registration. FIE also pointed out that this was anti-competitive against quarries that do comply with conditions.
We requested consideration of this matter in the context of ensuring that public money is spent ‘to good effect' and advise of their views accordingly.

On 21 July 2009 FIE wrote to all Local Authorities requesting that they refuse to purchase from those that have not complied with conditions,(which includes the non-payment of development levies and bonds), seeking full reply within four weeks ether acknowledging that this will become their policy 'or giving your reasons for not doing so'.

Meanwhile quarries continue to operate in non-compliance with registration conditions while supplying local authority projects with materials.

And how many quarries slipped through the planning process via quarry registration through the provision of incorrect and inaccurate information that nobody checked?

 

 

 

An 18 month investigation into why complaints about quarries around Ireland that are not meeting conditions imposed on them by local authorities has ended with a letter from the Ombudsman to FIE stating that the legislation designed to regulate quarries is unenforceable.

Quarry registration was the last section of the 2000 Planning Act to be implemented and it did not come into effect until 2005. Now 4 years later the Ombudsman is unable to make finding of maladministration against a local authority for not enforcing the conditions they imposed as ‘they are not in a position legally to conduct an administrative action'.

The Ombudsman noted that the Department has provided no time frame for amending the legislation. Not only has the environment been damaged by this long standing legislative failure and great hardships imposed on residents, but many millions in development levies can no longer be collected.

Read the tale of our ongoing investigation  | Letter to the Ombudsman  |   Press Release   |  Stephen Price's two part series in the Sunday Business Post on this story


FRIENDS OF THE IRISH ENVIRONMENT

PRESS RELEASE QUARRY LEGISLATION ENFORCEABLE  

Legislation designed to regulate quarries is unenforceable, according to the Ombudsman. 

Under the 2000 Planning Act, quarries which were already operating were required to apply for registration. The aim of the legislation was to achieve a final decision at the end of the registration process which was as accurate, comprehensive and enforceable as reasonably possible and which minimised the environmental impacts of the quarry. 

For example, Cork County Council received 97 applications for the registration of existing quarries in the county by the deadline on April 27th 2005.  Of these, 65 were considered valid applications.  12 were deemed to require planning permission because they were greater than 5 hectares in extent or located in a protected European site. 57 proceeded through the registration process. 

Public notices were published by the planning authority and submission and observations were made by the public which the local authorities were obliged to take into consideration. Conditions, including the payment of development contributions, were imposed by Councils on the operation of these quarries.  

However, an 18 month investigation by Friends if the Irish Environment into the failure of registered quarries throughout Ireland to meet their environmental conditions has now ended with a letter from the Ombudsman. 

This letter informed the group that the Department of the Environment has informed the Ombudsman that conditions imposed under this Act are unenforceable as ‘the act did not provide a mechanism for pursuing legal proceedings for non-compliance.’ 

In relation to the test case in County Cork provided to the Ombudsman, the letter explained that the Ombudsman could ‘not make a finding of maladministration against a local authority if they are not in a position legally to conduct an administrative action’. 

The Ombusdsman noted that the Department has provided no time frame for amending the legislation. A spokesman for the environmental lobby groups said that ‘Residents around the country have been complaining to us about out of control quarries that are paying no heed to the conditions imposed after the lengthy registration and consultation process.

 ‘It now appears that the failure of this legislation remains unaddressed by the Department of the Environment.

 ‘Not only has the environment been damaged by this long standing legislative failure and great hardships imposed on residents, but many millions in development levies can no longer be collected. 

ENDS   

 

Friends of the Irish Environment [FIE] have called for the repayment of a Údarás na Gaeltachta grant of £70,000 for an unauthorised quarry in Moycullen, County Galway.

Údarás chief executive Pádraig Ó hAoláin told the Dáil Public Accounts Committee yesterday that he would not be claiming the grant back, in spite of the fact that the quarry was located outside the Gaeltacht. The statement by Údarás chief executive that although the quarry was outside the Gaeltacht, it was 'like an island surrounded by land in the Gaeltacht' is not born out by the boundaries of the townlands in questions, which were marked by dry-stone famine walls of land mark quality and individually listed in the relevant 1956 legislation which defined the Gaeltacht.

A spokesman for FIE said this morning that 'The decision by Údarás na Gaeltachta not to recoup this grant after issuing a Revocation Notice in July of this year is further official support for the open flaunting of the planning system in a previously unspoiled karst landscape known as the 'Little Burren'.'

SEE WHAT THEY HAVE DONE! and the correspondence with the European Commission.

And today's Press Release.
Friends of the Irish Environment [FIE] have called for the repayment of a Údarás na Gaeltachta grant of £70,000 for an unauthorised quarry in Moycullen, County Galway.

Údarás chief executive Pádraig Ó hAoláin told the Dáil Public Accounts Committee yesterday that he would not be claiming the grant back, in spite of the fact that the quarry was located outside the Gaeltacht. The statement by Údarás chief executive that although the quarry was outside the Gaeltacht, it was 'like an island surrounded by land in the Gaeltacht' is not born out by the boundaries of the townlands in questions, which were marked by dry-stone famine walls of land mark quality and individually listed in the relevant 1956 legislation which defined the Gaeltacht.

A spokesman for FIE said this morning that 'The decision by Údarás na Gaeltachta not to recoup this grant after issuing a Revocation Notice in July of this year is further official support for the open flaunting of the planning system in a previously unspoiled karst landscape known as the 'Little Burren'.'

SEE WHAT THEY HAVE DONE! and the correspondence with the European Commission.

And today's Press Release.
On foot of the Taoiseach's intervention in a planning enforcement case [see our coverage], FIE points out that 'more than two years after the Planning Act came into force, the section requiring the registration of quarries has still not been implemented'. Our call was ignored by Dublin centred politicians, quarries are of no concern to them, but picked up by local radio stations in Roscommon, Clare, Mayo, Cavan, and Galway. The registration process would require publication and a chance for comment by the public, but an increasingly urban Ireland is turning its back on the quarry issue.

CALL FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF PLANNING ACT ON QUARRIES

Friends of the Irish Environment today wrote to Bertie Ahern, requesting him to implement Section 261 of the Planning Act 2000 to require registration of all quarries operating in the Republic.

'More than two years after the Planning Act came into force, the section requiring the registration of quarries has still not been implemented', the group claimed.

The registration process includes an opportunity for local authorities to impose new conditions on existing quarries and gives the public the right to comment on the terms of the permission.

Section 261 is intended to bring all quarries - including those who have claimed exception because they were operating before the 1963 Planning Act 1963 - within the planning system.

'The failure to implement this section is at the root of the current controversy over the alleged unauthorised quarry at Athleague', said a spokesman for the organisation.

More: Tony Lowes 027, 73025

Irish language: David Healy 01, 832 4087